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La météo (part 1)

This video is part of our free course beginners 1

“Il fait” + adjective

In this section, we are using “il fait,” which means “it does” followed by an adjective. In this section, we shall be exploring common ways to talk about the weather.

French English
Il fait beau The weather is nice
Il fait chaud The weather is hot
Il fait moche The weather is miserable
Il fait soleil The weather is sunny
Il fait nuageux The weather is cloudy
Il fait froid The weather is cold
Il fait humide The weather is humid
Il fait bon The weather is good/ pleasant
Il fait mauvais The weather is bad
Il fait doux The weather is mild

Note
Some of the above sentences can be used with adverbs like “très.” The adverb will go after “fait.”

Il fait très beau The weather is really nice

Note
Some of the adjectives used above can also be used to describe other things than the weather. “Moche” means “ugly,” “bon” means “good” for tastes, smells and abilities, “mauvais” is the opposite of “bon,” “beau” means “beautiful,” “mauvais” means “bad” and “doux” means “sweet or soft.”

Note
You can say two of the above sentences in a row. In this case, the second sentence doesn’t need “il fait.” They can be linked with “et”.

Il fait beau et chaud The weather is nice and hot

Note
You can say two of the above sentences in a row, and link them with “mais” to show contrast. In that case, you will need to say “il fait” after “mais”.

Il fait soleil mais il fait froid The weather is sunny, but it is cold


Verbs

In this section, we are using verbs only. The verbs below can only be used to talk about the weather and can only be used with “il” the impersonal subject for the weather.

Infinitive verb Present tense
Neiger → To snow Il neige → It’s snowing
Pleuvoir → To rain Il pleut → It’s raining
Grêler → To hail Il grêle → It’s hailing
Geler → To be freezing Il gèle → It’s freezing

Note
The French word for “snow” is “la neige,” the one for “rain” is “la pluie.” The French word for “hail” is “la grêle” and the one for “freeze” is “le gel.”

Note
As the above are verbs, “il” must be used even if you are using two sentences in a row.

Il pleut et il gèle It is raining, and it is freezing



“Il y a” + article + noun

In this section, we are using “il y a” which means “there is” or “there are” followed by an article and a noun. The article must be a partitive article. This can only be used in this section as described below.

French English
Il y a du tonnerre There is thunder
Il y a du brouillard It is foggy/ There is fog
Il y a du vent It is windy/ There is wind
Il y a des éclairs (m) There is lightning
Il y a de l’orage (m) It is stormy/ There is a storm

Note
Partitive articles are “du”, “de la”, “de l’” and “des”. They mean “some” for uncountable nouns. You can find the lesson on partitive articles in this book. When “des” is followed by a vowel or “h” use a “z” link.

Note
You can say two of the above sentences in a row. In this case, the second sentence doesn’t need “il y a.” They can be linked with “et,” and you must keep the partitive article.

Il y a du tonnerre et des éclairs There are thunder and lightning

Note
You can use this section with “du soleil,” “de la pluie,” “des nuages” or “de la neige.” As “il y a” means “there is or there are,” your sentence will be more descriptive.

Il y a de la neige sur la montagne There is snow on the mountain





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