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La météo (part 1)

This video is part of our free course beginners 1

“Le temps” + a verb

In this section, we are using “le temps” which means “the weather” plus a verb. The verbs used here are pronominal and must be preceded by “se” or “s.” Some people do not commonly use this section.

French English
Le temps s'éclaircit It’s clearing up
Le temps se couvre It’s clouding over
Le temps se rafraîchit It’s getting chilly
Le temps s’améliore It’s brightening up

Note
The lesson on pronominal verbs is in the book: beginners’ level 2.

Note
Instead of using this section, you can use the top section “il fait + adjectives” with “maintenant” which is the French word for “now.”

Il fait beau maintenant The weather is nice now/ It’s brightening up



“Il fait un temps” + adjective

In this section, we are using “il fait un temps” followed by an adjective. Most of the time these sentences are used on their own without anything else about the weather.

French English
Il fait un temps magnifique It’s a beautiful day
Il fait un temps affreux It’s an awful day
Il fait un temps pourri (I) It’s a rotten day
Il fait un temps couvert It’s overcast
Il fait un temps de saison It’s a typical “season” day
Il fait un temps épouvantable It’s a horrible day
Il fait un temps de chien (I) It’s a dreadful day
Il fait un temps superbe It’s a beautiful day

Note
(I) means informal.

Note
The literal meaning of “il fait un temps de chien” is “it’s a dog day.”

Note
You don’t need to say anything else about the weather if you use one of the sentences above. They are self-explanatory except if you use “mais” to show contrast.

Il fait un temps magnifique It’s a beautiful day

Il fait un temps magnifique mais il y a du vent It’s a beautiful day, but it’s windy

Note
In French, when you say “il fait un temps de saison,” you don’t need to be precise about the season.


Mixing sections

When talking about the weather, you can of course mix sections together; “et” or “mais” must be used before the last thing you will say. It is more common to mix the three first sections together.

Il fait nuageux et froid, il pleut et il y a du vent




Negation

In French, the negation is expressed by “ne” and “pas.” “Ne” goes before the conjugated verb and “pas” after it. “Ne” becomes “n’” in front of a vowel or “h.” Other negative words can be used instead of “pas”.

Il fait + adjective

In a negative sentence, “il fait” turns into “il ne fait pas” followed by the adjective.

Il fait beau The weather is nice

Il ne fait pas beau The weather is not nice




Verbs

In a negative sentence, “ne” goes before the conjugated verb and “pas” after it.

Il neige It is snowing

Il ne neige pas It is not snowing




Il y a + article + noun

In a negative sentence, “il y a” turns into “il n’y a pas” followed by “de” or “d’” and the noun.

Il y a du vent It’s windy

Il n’y a pas de vent It’s not windy



Note
“Du,” “de la,” “de l’” or “des” turn into “de” or “d’” in a negative sentence. “D’” is used in front of a vowel or “h.” 


Le temps + a verb

In a negative sentence, “ne” goes before “se” or “s’” and “pas” goes after the conjugated verb.

Le temps se couvre It is clouding over

Le temps ne se couvre pas It is not clouding over




Il fait un temps + adjective

In a negative sentence, “il fait un temps” turns into “il ne fait pas un temps” followed by the adjective.

Il fait un temps magnifique It is a beautiful day

Il ne fait pas un temps magnifique It is not a beautiful day







Find this lesson in

Beginners 1
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Beginners vol.1
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La météo (part 1)
  • Beginners level